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101 Supershots

One of the greatest golfers of all time teaches you how to broaden your repertoire of shots and add new dimensions to your game. Now everyone can benefit from Chi Chi Rodriguez’s knowledge and skill with 101 Supershots. He describes useful shots from tee to green, how to hit them and when to use them. Illustrations.

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One of the greatest golfers of all time teaches you how to broaden your repertoire of shots and add new dimensions to your game. Now everyone can benefit from Chi Chi Rodriguez’s knowledge and skill with 101 Supershots. He describes useful shots from tee to green, how to hit them and when to use them. Illustrations.

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1 review for 101 Supershots

  1. John Andrisani

    101 Supershots
    In the early 1970’s, I worked as an assistant golf professional at what was then called Colonie Hill; initially boasting an upscale all-men’s membership of only 50 individuals. The “Hill” has since been purchased by a major hotel chain and no longer strictly a private golf club. ]
    The facility featured a championship course of over 7,000 yards in length, with one par-five 610 yards.
    Topside, as we referred to where the $25 million entertainment center/hotel was located, was reached by driving up a steep road, to a plateau. Topside was where the action took place, with upscale bar and restaurant for entertaining members and their guests, and for those who wanted more, on the ballroom stage marquee names, notably Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Bobby Vinton, and Liza Minnelli performed each month.
    One year the club hosted a private pro-celebrity tournament, with comedian Bob Hope, baseball great Mickey Mantle, Don Maynard of the New York Jets football team, with Ben Crenshaw and Chi Chi leading the field of tour pros.
    I was thrilled to be introduced to Chi Chi, by Stan Stamile, a pro who worked for Chi Chi, as an assistant pro at the Dorado Beach resort in Puerto Rico during the winter months.
    I enjoyed talking to Chi Chi on the driving range, after the round, about his setup, swing, and equipment, since I was particularly interested is why he teed his ball up high, atop a long tee, and why the driver he played with featured such a heavy E-7 swing-weight.
    Chi Chi explained that the high tee position promotes a flatter swing and a clean sweep action of club-to-ball through impact, ideal for driving the ball, rather than a sharp downward hit more suitable to hitting short iron shots.
    The heavy club allows Chi Chi’s driver-shaft to flex in the impact zone, increasing the speed the club, and promoting a powerful snap-action at the moment of impact. The result: a long ball.

    Looking back, I had no reason to think at the time that I would ever meet Chi Chi again, but, as you know, life is unpredictable.
    During my time as senior editor of GOLF Magazine, from 1984-1998, and after I recruited Chi Chi as one of our publication’s Playing Editors, with approval by editor George Peper, I collaborated on instructional articles with Chi Chi. We worked so well together that we decided to write a book together, entitled 101 Supershots.
    During his winning days, Chi Chi was so highly respected as a shot-maker that Jack Nicklaus asked him to teach his son Gary some new short game shots. In reading 101 Supershots, you’ll learn how versatile, imaginative, and especially effective was Chi Chi’s short game.
    So much so, that the shots he features will allow you to handle any greenside situation and save par even from the toughest lies, such as one described in the book; ball buried near the lip of a greenside sand bunker.
    In this situation, you can make a big number if you try to “wing” a shot, rather than follow Chi Chi’s innovative recovery strategy. To do that, choose a putter to play the shot rather than a sand wedge, then setup and swing like Chi Chi does when recovering from such a lie.
    In playing this shot, one of a total of 101 extraordinary shots in the book, played from tee to green, set up with the ball back in your stance and your hands well ahead, and 70 percent of your weight on your left foot.
    Point the toe of the putter at an area of sand just behind the ball.
    Swing the club up on a steep plane, allowing your right wrist to hinge slightly as you employ a half-swing.
    Swing the club down, allowing your right wrist to unhinge as you pull the club down sharply, such that the toe of the club-head contacts the sand just behind the ball,
    This technique will pop the ball out of the sand so that it carries the bunker’s lip, lands quite softly on the green, then rolls toward the hole

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