Talking Too Much?

Talking Too Much?

GET REAL RORY!  

Rory Mcllroy is, without question, the most talented Super-Golfer today, yet I question what’s going on in that area between the ears, where the great Bobby Jones believed tournaments are won and lost.

I don’t say this because Rory swings full out on every shot, a mistake that has cost him dearly in major championships, when the timing and rhythm of his swing cannot keep pace with his overly quick tempo.

I don’t say this because Rory will keep talking and talking during interviews, like a Marlin running out the fisherman’s line, going on and on and over-thinking when it comes to analyzing his driving technique or club design.

I don’t say this because Rory tends to criticize courses outside rather than inside his home country of Ireland,

I SAY THIS BECAUSE ONCE, EVERY SO OFTEN, RORY SHOWS HE HAS FAILED TO STUDY THE GAME OF GOLF’S HISTORY, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO KNOWING THE BACK STORY BEHIND LINKS COURSES, NAMELY THE CONSIDERATIONS THAT MUST BE MADE FOR WIND WHEN SETTING UP A TOURNAMENT VENUE.

Case in Point: Rory recently commented that courses on the European Tour are set up easier than a decade earlier, just because he is shooting  a four-day total score that’s a couple of shots lower than a dozen years earlier, on the same courses.

For Rory to signal out Carnoustie, in Scotland, one of the most challenging and most historical courses to host The Open Championship (British Open) – Ben Hogan won this major, at this venue, in 1953 – as a push-over setup is absurd.

Rory neglects to point to the fact that he now hits the ball twenty yards longer off the tee than he did in 2007, when finishing low-amateur in the “British. This has a lot to do with Rory’s lower scores (albeit, a big two shots lower, over 72  holes!), simply because the longer the drive, particularly a 310 yards plus Rory drive, the shorter and more lofted the iron hit on approach shots. Consequently, the easier it is to hit the ball close to the hole and score birdie.

My point: More than a championship course set up easier, it is Rory’s longer driving due to technologically-advanced clubs and hotter balls that plays the biggest role in his shooting lower scores.  

In defense of a course set up less severe, Rory ignores the fact that on links courses, bordering the sea, sometimes when the wind changes direction, and changes directions again, the golfer often plays both the front and back (outward and inward) nine holes into a strong wind. Worse, the golfer can sometimes face severe crosswinds throughout the round of eighteen holes, causing the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews and the local course to raise the course’s par, or “Standard Scratch,” such that the score is balanced against the conditions and handicaps are kept honest. Turning in extra-high scores on very windy days, without changing the course’s Standard Scratch would cause handicaps to be inflated.

I have played Carnoustie and I can tell you this: If the course is set up easier, but the wind blows in any direction, the course is anything but a push-over.

So I don’t know where Rory is coming from. In fact, because European Tour course venues are tougher to score on and all so different to one another, as opposed to United States courses, in general, is the very reason European golfers have come on strong, winning in America, and cleaning our clock in the Ryder Cup.

Rory, if I can have the last word, please, if you want to make the kind of comments I spoke to herein, about courses being set up easier, be a man like Tiger has been throughout his career, and do your thing after winning, next time, not after losing.  

Enjoy Golf
John Andrisani

John Andrisani

Former senior instruction editor at GOLF Magazine, writer of around one-hundred articles on putting in publications worldwide, and author of 40 how-to golf books, including  The Short Game Magic of Tiger Woods and Hogan on the Green.

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